Now accepting Telehealth appointments. Schedule a virtual visit.

Birth Control


 

birth control

What different types of birth control are available?

As a woman, you have a wide variety of birth control options. At FPA Women’s Health, the team helps you decide the type of birth control that’s best for you with regard to your overall health, your pregnancy goals, and your lifestyle. Some birth control methods for women include:

Each birth control method has different advantages, so your doctor helps you decide which one is right for you. Many of these methods provide 99% or more effectiveness in preventing pregnancy temporarily, long term, or permanently. 

How do IUDs prevent pregnancy?

An IUD is a small, flexible, T-shaped device that your provider inserts into your uterus. IUDs are long-acting, reversible birth control devices, typically preventing pregnancy from 3-10 years. IUDs are a safe, highly effective birth control method for women who don’t wish to become pregnant in the immediate future. 

Some IUDs release low doses of hormones that interfere with your body’s ovulation cycle, another type is a hormone-free IUD that contains copper. The copper prevents sperm from reaching an egg and fertilizing it, and can even work as an emergency contraception up to five days after unprotected sex. 

Click here to learn more about IUDs and the different options that are available. 

Your provider at FPA Women’s Health easily inserts the IUD in a matter of minutes during an office visit. When you no longer want to prevent pregnancy, your provider can easily remove the IUD and your body resumes or continues its natural ovulation cycle.

How does the Depo shot prevent pregnancy?

The Depo shot is a birth control injection that contains the hormone progestin. You receive the shot every three months and the hormones prevent you from ovulating. Progestin also thickens the mucus in your cervix to make it harder for sperm to get through. 

After stopping the Depo shot, it could take up to 10 months or more before you begin ovulating, so it’s not always the best option if you want to become pregnant within a year after using it as your method of birth control. 

In addition to preventing pregnancy, several different types of contraceptives offer other benefits such as lighter periods and less menstrual pain. If you’d like to learn more about birth control and discover which method is best for your needs, call the office or request the next available appointment online. 

 

CALL US   

 

Book Online

Birth Control

Intrauterine Device (IUD)

An intrauterine device (IUD), also known as a intrauterine contraceptive (IUC), is a small, flexible “T” shaped device that is placed inside of the uterus. These long-acting birth control devices can provide pregnancy prevention for 3-10 years depending on which IUD you choose. Paragard IUD is small, safe, and highly effective. IUD’s can be placed during a routine office visit in a matter of minutes. Paragard is a soft, copper, flexible IUC that contains no hormones. It’s a reliable birth control method that can last up to 10 years.

 

Essure Permanent Birth Control

This is a non-surgical option of sterilization for women. Two small coil-shaped devices are placed in the fallopian tubes using cameras. You will be put under during the procedure. The procedure is covered by most insurance plans. No method of birth control is without its drawbacks. After you’ve struggled with various birth control methods for a while, and after you’ve had all the children you want, you may want to consider permanent birth control, or sterilization. Female sterilization is a procedure that works by blocking the fallopian tubes, thus preventing the eggs released by the ovaries from reaching the uterus and being fertilized by sperm.

 

The Depo Shot

An injection of progestin is made into the hip or arm every 12 weeks to the patient. This method is around 92% effective. It requires that the patient visit the doctor ever 3 months to get the next shot. The Depo shot (DMPA), or Depo Provera, is a long acting progesterone contraceptive injection. This method of birth control is effective, convenient, and lasts three months. DMPA is safe even for women who can not take estrogen. It works by stopping ovulation and thickening cervical mucus which helps to prevent sperm from reaching the female egg. Simply make an appointment with your health care provider every three months to receive your DMPA injection.

 

The Pill

A hormone pill is taken orally by you every single day, ideally around the same time. Requires a doctor’s visit where they will give you a prescription for the pill. The Birth Control Pill (also called oral contraceptives or “the pill”) is one of the most popular types of birth control. Different brands of birth control pills vary in their dose, which hormones are used, and length of cycle. Currently, most birth control pills have low dose of hormones and have few side effects. The Pill, as well as other hormonal contraceptives, must be prescribed by a Clinician.

 

Vaginal Ring

This form of birth control is self-administered once every 3 weeks, and is around 92% effective. Over the month the ring releases hormones into the body that may or may not cause side effect. Nuva Ring is easily inserted in the vagina and left there for 21 days each month – It is then removed for seven days for your period to come. You will need to insert and remove the Nuva Ring yourself each month. A new ring needs to be inserted in the vagina at the same time, on the same day of the week following your period each month to be most effective. If you do not insert The Ring on time, it is important to use a backup form of birth control that month as you are more likely to get pregnant. While the Ring is removed for your period, you are still protected from getting pregnant.

 

The Patch

This method releases hormones through the skin into the blood stream. The patch must be replaced each week for three weeks. After the three weeks you go for a week without the patch. The Contraceptive Patch is a combination hormonal patch containing both progestin and estrogen, similar to most birth control pills. You will apply The Patch to the abdomen, buttock, upper outer arm, or upper torso (excluding the breast). Wherever you placed it one week cannot be used again the next week – the location must be alternated.

 

Plan B

At Family Planning Associates, we use Plan B® (“morning after pill”) for emergency contraception. Plan B is the first progestin-only emergency contraception to be approved by the FDA. Emergency Contraceptive Pill (ECP) commonly known as the “Morning After Pill” or “Plan B®” is for women who may have had unprotected sex or had their birth control fail during sex within the past 72 hours and are concerned that they may become pregnant. This simple oral medication can greatly reduce their chance of pregnancy. This medication can also be prescribed in advance for those patients who wish to be prepared. ECPs are meant to be used as emergency contraception, and not for regular use.

 

Tubal Sterilization

No method of birth control is without its drawbacks. After you’ve struggled with various birth control methods for a while, and after you’ve had all the children you want, you may want to consider permanent birth control, or sterilization. Female sterilization is a procedure that works by blocking the Fallopian tubes, thus preventing the eggs released by the ovaries from reaching the uterus and being fertilized by sperm. Tubal Cauterization is one of the methods of serialization we offer. This is the “traditional” tubal sterilization procedure where two small incisions are made in the abdominal wall of the patient and the fallopian tubes are scarred by cauterization (aka. burning) to cause occlusion. Unlike the newer ESSURE (www.essure.com) procedure, this method does involve two surgical incisions.